Tag Archives: clinical trials transparency

Details: TCPS-2 vs the CIHR trials policy of 2010

Thanks to a few days’ time and some help from people with more experience reading science policy, I now feel that I can expand on my previous post about the TCPS-2 “superseding” the Dec 2010 CIHR trials policy.

First of all, I note that I am putting “supersede” in quotes not merely because it is a really cool word to which I wish to draw attention (although it is) but because the TCPS-2 was officially launched before (not, as I had previously thought, simultaneously with) the new Trials Policy, and as such, would not likely have been intended as a replacement for another policy that had not yet been unveiled.

Non-exhaustive list of differences between the TCPS-2 and the CIHR trials policy of 2010:

  • Unlike the TCPS-2, the CIHR policy required that the systematic review that justifies doing the trial be publicly cited.
  • TCPS-2 is specifically about clinical trials, whereas CIHR could be interpreted to apply to a wider scope of “controlled and uncontrolled trials.”
  • The CIHR policy required following the WHO international standards, whereas the TCPS-2 only requires that trials be registeres in registries that meet the criteria of WHO/ICMJE. Seems like a small distinction, but the difference is the minimum dataset required.
  • This one is kind of nitpicking/pointing out an oversight, but the CIHR required the name of the trial registry as well as the registation #, whereas the TCPS-2 only asks for the # (kind of useless without the name, and presumably they want the name too, but didn’t specify).
  • The CIHR policy took steps to prevent duplicate/multiple registration, whereas the TCPS-2 does not address this potential issue.
  • The TCPS-2 says that “Researchers should also promptly share new information about an intervention with other researchers or clinicians administering it to participants or patients, and with the scientific community – to the extent that it may be relevant to the general public’s welfare,” which does not require public disclosure. The CIHR policy required the data to be made publicly available to all.
  • Research design amendments (changes) require ethical approval under the TCPS-2. The CIHR policy required that amendments  to the research design be reported within 30 days after the ethics approval.
  • The TCPS-2 asks for “new risks” or “unanticipated issues that have possible health or safety consequences for participants” during the trial. CIHR policy did not ask for adverse event info until after the trial.
  • TCPS-2 asks for info that might merit or lead to early stopping of  a trial. CIHR policy wanted notification and public disclosure within 30 days of stopping a trial early.
  • The TCPS-2 tells researchers “to make reasonable efforts to publicly disseminate the findings of clinical trials in a timely manner by publications and by the inclusion of raw data and results in appropriate databases,” whereas the CIHR policy specified reporting guidelines (e.g., CONSORT for RCTs) and required reporting and public disclosure within 12 months of the end of the trial, building on the existing CIHR research access policy.
  • The TCPS-2 encourages researchers and institutions to publish results in a timely manner. The CIHR policy required public disclosure within 12 months and reserved the right to disclose the final report themselves within 18 months.
  • The TCPS-2 asks for “the inclusion of raw data and results in appropriate databases” whereas the CIHR specified what appropriate databases are and that both micro (aka “raw” aka “participant level”) as well as macro (aka “aggregate” aka “summary”) level data are necessary.
  • The TCPS-2 talks about ethics with regard to confidentiality clauses and PI access to trial data, whereas these issues were not addressed by the CIHR trials policy.
  • The CIHR policy talks about after-trial follow-up, including submission of any “severe adverse events or harm” to the publicly-available trial registry and a requirement to “retain all trial information including original micro-level data and metadata data for twenty five years unless they are deposited in a freely accessible data repository (to align with the Health Canada requirements).”

Generally speaking, major differences are:

1) Insider vs public disclosure of information

TCPS-2 is concerned with sharing info with the research ethics board and “to other researchers or clinicians administering it to participants or patients, and with the scientific community.”

CIHR was concerned with reporting and disclosing info “to CIHR and the trial registry” – and the trial registry had to be openly accessible to the public.

2) Whether to specify how much should be reported, and how soon to report it

The TCPS-2 advises on ethical matters across disciplines. It makes few specific mandates as to timeliness or data specifics.

The CIHR policy was intended specifically for trials funded by CIHR, and similar to other funding policies could and did specify details of what kind of data should be reported (all, macro and micro), to whom (CIHR and a publicly accessible registry), and when (within 12 months of trial completion, or with some types of data 30 days of early stoppage of a trial).

TCPS-2  on its own vs. as part of a comprehensive approach

I’m not saying the TCPS-2 is bad. It’s pretty good, overall, and after years and years of collaboartive work and revision seems to do an admirable job of doing what it’s supposed to do – which is to set out general, interdisciplinary, national ethical guidelines, not details of practice requirements. Without specific procedural policies designed to instruct researchers in various disciplines, the TCPS-2’s appropriately limited scope leaves us with somewhat vague directions.

The two policies, the TCPS-2 and the CIHR trials policy of 2010, are clearly intended to complement with each other. As I noted before, the TCPS-2 specifically states that:

“[Trial] registries, in addition to agency policies, editorial policies, ethical policy reforms, and revised national and institutional ethics policies and results disclosure requirements, contribute to a multi-faceted approach to eliminate non-disclosure.” (emphasis mine)

I continue to be very disappointed that the CIHR has apparently seen fit to retroactively withdraw their facet of this approach, and I do think that as a public agency they do owe the public a decent explanation of what happened here. What has been made publicly available thus far does not add up. As I have stated previously, there may well be valid reasons for killing the new policy on clinical trial data, but the lack of transparency around the policy retraction continues to be troubling.

-Greyson


Advertisements

2 Comments

Filed under censorship, democracy, ethics, funding, government, Health, OA

Follow-up: CIHR trials transparency policy

Here is the official word from the CIHR on the clinical trials transparency policy that was so transparent that no one could see it:

According to  Dr. Ian Graham, Vice-President, Knowledge Translation, the new Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans (TCPS-2) supersedes the Policy on registration and results disclosure of controlled and uncontrolled trials funded by CIHR.

The trials registration & disclosure policy page that was recently a 404 page is now a redirect page to the TCPS-2.

I find this response unsatisfying. Here’s why:

  • I don’t understand why a policy would supersede another policy announced at the same time. Both policies were in development for years, but they didn’t notice until three months after they were simultaneously unveiled that they were redundant? Seems unlikely.
  • It also seems odd that CIHR would send a KT Senior Advisor on a tour around the country educating people all about a new policy they would then suddenly decide was obsolete.
  • While I have been assured that “CIHR is committed to transparency in clinical trials,” I have not gotten a clear answer as to whether or not all the exact requirements of the apparently-obsolete CIHR policy are included in the TCPS-2. (Am working on going through it with a fine-toothed comb, but it is >200 pages long and I have a head cold, so it’s slow going. ) I am particularly concerned about the preservation & disclosure of individual-level data and reporting of all adverse events in clinical trials.
  • The TCPS-2 clearly states (Article 11.3) that “[Trial] registries, in addition to agency policies, editorial policies, ethical policy reforms, and revised national and institutional ethics policies and results disclosure requirements, contribute to a multi-faceted approach to eliminate non-disclosure.” It is concerning that CIHR apparently does not feel that the  CIHR policy facet of this “multi-faceted approach” is important.

If the TCPS-2 does ensure the same clinical trial reporting standards as the recently-retired-at-a-young-age CIHR policy, then this is possibly just an embarrassing right-hand-doesn’t-kn0w-what-left-hand-is-doing situation.

If, on the other hand (er, that would be the third hand in the middle, I guess?) the TCPS-2 is not as specific in mandate for clinical trial registration and reporting as the CIHR policy was, this is a great loss for open access, open data and public health and safety. Making detailed clinical trial data publicly available for third-party re-analysis is the best way we have to provide safeguards on drug approval, safety & effectiveness processes – processes that CMAJ rightly criticizes as opaque and secretive.

CMAJ has its own conflicts of interest, certainly, and I haven’t let them off the hook for that. But they are not the only ones. We must be vigilant not only about transparency in our scholarly publishing processes, but also about our government health agencies, including those that fund scientific research.

I would hope that CIHR’s relationship with, say, pharmaceutical companies (and their former employees), would never dictate their clinical trials policies. But I want the transparency to know that is true, for sure. And I’m certainly not getting it around this question right now.

If anyone has more info on this, I’m still looking for insight here, so please contact me.

-Greyson

3 Comments

Filed under democracy, digitization, ethics, funding, government, Health, OA