Tag Archives: Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Details: TCPS-2 vs the CIHR trials policy of 2010

Thanks to a few days’ time and some help from people with more experience reading science policy, I now feel that I can expand on my previous post about the TCPS-2 “superseding” the Dec 2010 CIHR trials policy.

First of all, I note that I am putting “supersede” in quotes not merely because it is a really cool word to which I wish to draw attention (although it is) but because the TCPS-2 was officially launched before (not, as I had previously thought, simultaneously with) the new Trials Policy, and as such, would not likely have been intended as a replacement for another policy that had not yet been unveiled.

Non-exhaustive list of differences between the TCPS-2 and the CIHR trials policy of 2010:

  • Unlike the TCPS-2, the CIHR policy required that the systematic review that justifies doing the trial be publicly cited.
  • TCPS-2 is specifically about clinical trials, whereas CIHR could be interpreted to apply to a wider scope of “controlled and uncontrolled trials.”
  • The CIHR policy required following the WHO international standards, whereas the TCPS-2 only requires that trials be registeres in registries that meet the criteria of WHO/ICMJE. Seems like a small distinction, but the difference is the minimum dataset required.
  • This one is kind of nitpicking/pointing out an oversight, but the CIHR required the name of the trial registry as well as the registation #, whereas the TCPS-2 only asks for the # (kind of useless without the name, and presumably they want the name too, but didn’t specify).
  • The CIHR policy took steps to prevent duplicate/multiple registration, whereas the TCPS-2 does not address this potential issue.
  • The TCPS-2 says that “Researchers should also promptly share new information about an intervention with other researchers or clinicians administering it to participants or patients, and with the scientific community – to the extent that it may be relevant to the general public’s welfare,” which does not require public disclosure. The CIHR policy required the data to be made publicly available to all.
  • Research design amendments (changes) require ethical approval under the TCPS-2. The CIHR policy required that amendments  to the research design be reported within 30 days after the ethics approval.
  • The TCPS-2 asks for “new risks” or “unanticipated issues that have possible health or safety consequences for participants” during the trial. CIHR policy did not ask for adverse event info until after the trial.
  • TCPS-2 asks for info that might merit or lead to early stopping of  a trial. CIHR policy wanted notification and public disclosure within 30 days of stopping a trial early.
  • The TCPS-2 tells researchers “to make reasonable efforts to publicly disseminate the findings of clinical trials in a timely manner by publications and by the inclusion of raw data and results in appropriate databases,” whereas the CIHR policy specified reporting guidelines (e.g., CONSORT for RCTs) and required reporting and public disclosure within 12 months of the end of the trial, building on the existing CIHR research access policy.
  • The TCPS-2 encourages researchers and institutions to publish results in a timely manner. The CIHR policy required public disclosure within 12 months and reserved the right to disclose the final report themselves within 18 months.
  • The TCPS-2 asks for “the inclusion of raw data and results in appropriate databases” whereas the CIHR specified what appropriate databases are and that both micro (aka “raw” aka “participant level”) as well as macro (aka “aggregate” aka “summary”) level data are necessary.
  • The TCPS-2 talks about ethics with regard to confidentiality clauses and PI access to trial data, whereas these issues were not addressed by the CIHR trials policy.
  • The CIHR policy talks about after-trial follow-up, including submission of any “severe adverse events or harm” to the publicly-available trial registry and a requirement to “retain all trial information including original micro-level data and metadata data for twenty five years unless they are deposited in a freely accessible data repository (to align with the Health Canada requirements).”

Generally speaking, major differences are:

1) Insider vs public disclosure of information

TCPS-2 is concerned with sharing info with the research ethics board and “to other researchers or clinicians administering it to participants or patients, and with the scientific community.”

CIHR was concerned with reporting and disclosing info “to CIHR and the trial registry” – and the trial registry had to be openly accessible to the public.

2) Whether to specify how much should be reported, and how soon to report it

The TCPS-2 advises on ethical matters across disciplines. It makes few specific mandates as to timeliness or data specifics.

The CIHR policy was intended specifically for trials funded by CIHR, and similar to other funding policies could and did specify details of what kind of data should be reported (all, macro and micro), to whom (CIHR and a publicly accessible registry), and when (within 12 months of trial completion, or with some types of data 30 days of early stoppage of a trial).

TCPS-2  on its own vs. as part of a comprehensive approach

I’m not saying the TCPS-2 is bad. It’s pretty good, overall, and after years and years of collaboartive work and revision seems to do an admirable job of doing what it’s supposed to do – which is to set out general, interdisciplinary, national ethical guidelines, not details of practice requirements. Without specific procedural policies designed to instruct researchers in various disciplines, the TCPS-2’s appropriately limited scope leaves us with somewhat vague directions.

The two policies, the TCPS-2 and the CIHR trials policy of 2010, are clearly intended to complement with each other. As I noted before, the TCPS-2 specifically states that:

“[Trial] registries, in addition to agency policies, editorial policies, ethical policy reforms, and revised national and institutional ethics policies and results disclosure requirements, contribute to a multi-faceted approach to eliminate non-disclosure.” (emphasis mine)

I continue to be very disappointed that the CIHR has apparently seen fit to retroactively withdraw their facet of this approach, and I do think that as a public agency they do owe the public a decent explanation of what happened here. What has been made publicly available thus far does not add up. As I have stated previously, there may well be valid reasons for killing the new policy on clinical trial data, but the lack of transparency around the policy retraction continues to be troubling.

-Greyson


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The mystery of the missing CIHR trials policy

Who stole the Canadian Institutes of Health Research’s trial transparency policy?

Canadian health researchers report that the policy, only four months old, went missing sometime in mid-March. The policy’s full name is Policy on the registration and results disclosure of controlled and uncontrolled trials funded by CIHR.

It was last seen in the vicinity of the CIHR/IRSC website, at http://www.cihr-irsc.gc.ca/e/42831.html. The policy is described as an expansion of a previous CIHR policy, aimed at increasing clinical trial transparency and reducing biased disclosure of trial results.

We have evidence that the policy was alive not long ago.

1) Canadian health researchers around the country have received the following announcement of this new policy via e-alerts and newsletters over the past few months:

CIHR announces new policy
Policy on the registration and results disclosure of controlled and uncontrolled trials funded by CIHR (http://www.cihr-irsc.gc.ca/e/42831.html)
In 2006 the CIHR endorsed, in principle, the World Health Organization (WHO) international standards for clinical trial registration. Consequently, CIHR has updated its policy effective 20th December 2010. The new Policy will apply to all competitions with application deadlines after 1st January 2011.
The new Policy requires researchers awarded CIHR funding to:
* Register a trial in one of the WHO primary registries or      ClinicalTrials.gov prior to participant recruitment;
* Regularly update the information during the trial;
* Report and publicly disclose trial results; and
* Retain all trial information for 25 years.

The updated Policy expands on the 2004 policy on RCT registration. This Policy complies with the WHO International standards, ICMJE requirements and the Declaration of Helsinki.The Policy will help ensure that clinicians, researchers, patients and the public have access to information about CIHR-funded trials. The aim is to increase transparency and accessibility of trials by their prospective registration and disclosure of results, thereby reducing publication bias and fulfilling ethical responsibilities.
The new Policy can be accessed via the CIHR Funding Policies web page (http://www.cihr-irsc.gc.ca/e/204.html)

2) The CIHR glossary refers to this policy (under “Results”).

3) There’s a nice archived abstract and PDF of the slides from a presentation explaining the origins, development and details of the new policy, “Towards Greater International Transparency of Clinical Trials – Short Term Efforts for Long term Benefits: CIHR Trial Policy 2010” given in February by Karmela Krleza-Jeric,MD, M.Sc., D.Sc.

But the policy hasn’t been seen in at least a week, possibly longer.

The URL to which the above sources refer as the policy document on the CIHR website is currently a 404 Error page.

At first, it might seem to be merely a website glitch. However, the policy is also missing entirely from the above mentioned CIHR Funding Policies web page, despite the fact that the other recently added policy on Gender and Sex Based Analysis is listed, and the page currently says it was last updated a week ago on March 28, 2011.

Whodunnit?

Policy wonks continue to search for the missing policy, last seen at least one week ago.

At this point, authorities can only speculate on motives for this disappearance. However, the spectre of institutional conflict of interest has been raised.  At this point, we are making an appeal to the public to please contact us with any information you may have about the policy’s disappearance.

Anyone with information on the current whereabouts of the CIHR Policy on the registration and results disclosure of controlled and uncontrolled trials is asked to please leave a comment below. We hope to see this young policy safely back at home again as soon as possible.

Thank you.

-Greyson

ETA – Cached copy of the policy text is now available here.

ETA2 – Follow up post here. And another here. Also here.

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CIHR using OSS for learning modules

The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) recently unveiled three knowledge translation learning modules, the first of their new CIHR Online Tutorial courses.

I don’t know much about the background or driving force behind creation of these modules, but from the website it looks like the plan is to develop learning tutorials in several categories, with KT leading the pack.

CIHR has been a Canadian leader in encouraging Open Access to research outputs, and I was pleased to notice that they are also showing leadership in using Open Source Software, as the Learning Modules are run with the open source course management software Moodle.

I use Moodle in some classes I teach, and my non-systems-administrator perspective is that while it’s not perfect, it’s no harder/more frustrating to use, and certainly more versatile than proprietary software packages such as Blackboard or WebCT.

Kudos to CIHR for efficient use of public resources and for quietly demonstrating professional use of OSS!

-Greyson

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