A New Approach to Service Planning (Revisited)

UPDATED FROM PREVIOUS POSTING

As managers within library systems, we have the opportunity to be involved in the development of strategic objectives – and hence – the actions needed by staff to complete these objectives.  Service planning is an important part of this process.  As you have probably read from previous postings (e.g. see posting) there are various techniques which  can be applied ‘on the ground’ to actively engage with community – in order to ensure that the services developed by public libraries truly reflect the needs of community, and not just staff perception of community based information needs.

So, how can a library system involve community in the development of regional plans?  This is a good question, and there is no ‘one’ answer, since each library system will develop plans differently.  However, there are some steps which will be important to consider if you want to ensure your library system is developing programs and services with community.

As library staff begin to work with the newly targeted community, it is beneficial to create a plan which is multiphased – so community input and involvement can continuously have impacts.  Predetermined outputs, outcomes, and impacts, which are based on library management perceptions at the beginning of a service planning process – implies library led, not community led.

In order to ensure that service planning is completed from a community-led approach, each of the following steps can be part of the service planning process.  They include:

Segment

Determine which community you are writing a service plan for (e.g., Immigrants, Older Adults, People with Varying abilities, Teens etc.).  You can’t write an effective service plan for the entire community.

Determine Baseline

Internally – What resources/strengths/relationships does the library currently have to work with targeted community (e.g. – existing knowledge of community (gathering locations inside the library system or in the community, cultural norms, etc…), relationships with individuals from the community, collections, other existing services …

Externally – Who are the key individuals or organizations which should be contacted, in order to begin building external relationships with the targeted community?  Remember, the intent of community led services is not to have organizational representatives or community spokespersons identify community need; however, they can provide a wealth of information which will guide the service planning process – and provide the library with access to individual community members.  As relationships are built, start to document what you are hearing from the community (what is their perception of need, asset, role for the library etc.)

Analyze – Analyze what you/staff are hearing from the community and go back to the targeted community and verify… is what we are hearing correct?  Start exploring or at a minimum, thinking about potential service responses.

ENGAGE: Build Staff Capacity/ Engage Individuals in the Community

If a library system is going to work closely with a targeted community, it is essential that library staff are given the opportunity to know about the targeted community (what has been learned to this point from relationships which have been built) and community led approaches.  If branch or public service staff who will be working with the community are not provided with upfront training, it highly increases the danger of failure.

While service providers have provided a glimpse of the individual life circumstances of the targeted group – only by directly engaging (not solely observing) and developing relationships with individuals, will library staff be able to start hearing about community needs.

Systemic Change / Branch Based Change

Build in mechanisms which allow for community involvement in impacting the development of program and service responses either across the system or in a specific community/library branch.  Many times a change in one branch can be expanded to have a regional impact.  If the change only occurs in one branch, community members will be disappointed if they visit another branch which has not implemented the change….

Communicate and Evaluate!

Since this process moves service development from an internal process, to both an internal and external process – it is important to clearly communicate both internally and externally.  Make sure others are kept in ‘the know’.  It is important to explain the implications of what you are hearing from your target group to internal and external stakeholders.  The advantage of constantly communicating with community members, is it also provides an opportunity to evaluate.

~Ken

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2 responses to “A New Approach to Service Planning (Revisited)

  1. Pingback: What is the Purpose of Engaging Communities? | Social Justice Librarian

  2. Pingback: Determining and Displaying the Value of Libraries: Time to Take this Seriously | Social Justice Librarian

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