Follow-up: CIHR trials transparency policy

Here is the official word from the CIHR on the clinical trials transparency policy that was so transparent that no one could see it:

According to  Dr. Ian Graham, Vice-President, Knowledge Translation, the new Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans (TCPS-2) supersedes the Policy on registration and results disclosure of controlled and uncontrolled trials funded by CIHR.

The trials registration & disclosure policy page that was recently a 404 page is now a redirect page to the TCPS-2.

I find this response unsatisfying. Here’s why:

  • I don’t understand why a policy would supersede another policy announced at the same time. Both policies were in development for years, but they didn’t notice until three months after they were simultaneously unveiled that they were redundant? Seems unlikely.
  • It also seems odd that CIHR would send a KT Senior Advisor on a tour around the country educating people all about a new policy they would then suddenly decide was obsolete.
  • While I have been assured that “CIHR is committed to transparency in clinical trials,” I have not gotten a clear answer as to whether or not all the exact requirements of the apparently-obsolete CIHR policy are included in the TCPS-2. (Am working on going through it with a fine-toothed comb, but it is >200 pages long and I have a head cold, so it’s slow going. ) I am particularly concerned about the preservation & disclosure of individual-level data and reporting of all adverse events in clinical trials.
  • The TCPS-2 clearly states (Article 11.3) that “[Trial] registries, in addition to agency policies, editorial policies, ethical policy reforms, and revised national and institutional ethics policies and results disclosure requirements, contribute to a multi-faceted approach to eliminate non-disclosure.” It is concerning that CIHR apparently does not feel that the  CIHR policy facet of this “multi-faceted approach” is important.

If the TCPS-2 does ensure the same clinical trial reporting standards as the recently-retired-at-a-young-age CIHR policy, then this is possibly just an embarrassing right-hand-doesn’t-kn0w-what-left-hand-is-doing situation.

If, on the other hand (er, that would be the third hand in the middle, I guess?) the TCPS-2 is not as specific in mandate for clinical trial registration and reporting as the CIHR policy was, this is a great loss for open access, open data and public health and safety. Making detailed clinical trial data publicly available for third-party re-analysis is the best way we have to provide safeguards on drug approval, safety & effectiveness processes – processes that CMAJ rightly criticizes as opaque and secretive.

CMAJ has its own conflicts of interest, certainly, and I haven’t let them off the hook for that. But they are not the only ones. We must be vigilant not only about transparency in our scholarly publishing processes, but also about our government health agencies, including those that fund scientific research.

I would hope that CIHR’s relationship with, say, pharmaceutical companies (and their former employees), would never dictate their clinical trials policies. But I want the transparency to know that is true, for sure. And I’m certainly not getting it around this question right now.

If anyone has more info on this, I’m still looking for insight here, so please contact me.

-Greyson

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3 Comments

Filed under democracy, digitization, ethics, funding, government, Health, OA

3 responses to “Follow-up: CIHR trials transparency policy

  1. Pingback: The mystery of the missing CIHR trials policy | Social Justice Librarian

  2. Pingback: Details: TCPS-2 vs the CIHR trials policy of 2010 | Social Justice Librarian

  3. Pingback: BMJ article about the CIHR trials policy disappearance | Social Justice Librarian

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