Online consultation on metered internet: Need we say more?

Now that the NDP, the Liberals, Green Party and Conservative Party(including the PM’s office and Minister of Industry) have all suddenly come out against the CRTC’s usage-based billing ruling, the CRTC has announced that they will be reconsidering and are seeking comments/submissions. Online.

It almost feels like I could end this post there, as conducting an online consultation about whether the public should be rationing their Internet usage is irony enough, is it not?

But I suppose I should post the consultation details:

  • Notice #2011-77 is here
  • It asks specifically for comments about the billing practices for wholesale residential high-speed access services, so they’re concerned here about the impact on small ISPs who get their bandwidth from the big guys, not necessarily on the impact on the public/consumer, libraries, Internet cafes, Netflix or innovation in Canada
  • In order to comment you have to register by Feb 22 and submit commenst by March 28.
  • This is what they’re looking for, in their own words:

Comments are invited on:

i.   How best to implement the following principles with respect to large incumbents’ wholesale services used by Small ISPs;

a.   As a general rule, ordinary consumers served by Small ISPs should not have to   fund the bandwidth used by the heaviest retail Internet service consumers.

b.   It is in the best interest of consumers that Small ISPs, which offer competitive alternatives to the incumbent carriers, should continue to do so.

ii. Whether the Commission should set a minimum threshold level for the sale of bandwidth by large incumbent carriers to the Small ISPs and, if so, what should it be;

iii. Whether it is appropriate to hold an online consultation as part of its review; and

iv. Whether it is appropriate to hold an oral public hearing as part of its review.

I encourage you to submit something. And to keep a copy, in case it gets lost the way my copyright consulatation submission did, because if you keep a copy it can get found the way mine did, too. Here’s the first example I’ve seen of someone (Jason Koblovsky) posting their UBB submission.

Technically you can submit comments via mail as well, but you have to dig to find out where & how. “Regular” people who might want to comment will presumably go the website and click on the “submit” button, fill out the online form, and be done with it. I wouldn’t be surprised if the CRTC went ahead with point iii above and held a full-on online consultation process, complete with streaming video from Nik Nanos et al.

Fortunately, you don’t have to worry about how much bandwidth uploading your submission will eat up. Yet.

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